1777

Front third of the house and barn built with trees felled clearing the land, without nails, the walls insulated with horsehair and finished with plaster.

The House and Land

The Old Roads All Lead Here

One of the reasons that the trails near the farm are so extensive is that North Amherst was once the industrial corridor of Amherst with small factories power by dams up and down the Mill River, the pilings and spilloffs still in evidence even in the most remote stretches of the river. For more information on the area for a history of Puffer's Pond with illustrated map on the Amherst Town website 

1840

Peter King, originally from Pelham, bought the house and added the middle section for his large family. The back third of the house was built as a barn. Pictures in the archives of the Jones Library show members of the King family gathered on a porch on side of the house that has since been torn down. Mules rather than horses were included in several family portraits. This branch of the King family were descendants of the Rice family, renamed after a great-grandfather Samuel Rice King (1667-1713) added his mother's name (Elizabeth King 1635-1667) to his own.  

1860

Granite steps and walkways were added around the house and barn. Construction was begun on what became the five oldest houses on the hill, all built for members of the King family. Flat Hills Road was known as King Street until about 1900. Large tracts of adjoining land were added, eventually extending 2-1/2 miles south to Pelham Road, only to be resold as family fortunes declined.

1989

The Connolly's renamed the farm they had just purchased Stillpoint. They spent a year building fences, clearing rocks and dead trees and renovating the farmhouse before beginning construction of their current house, the indoor riding arena and (a few years later) the outdoor riding ring. 


...At the still point of the turning world. Neither flesh nor fleshless;
Neither from nor towards; at the still point, there the dance is,
But neither arrest nor movement. And do not call it fixity,
​Where past and future are gathered. Neither movement from nor towards,
Neither ascent nor decline. Except for the point, the still point,
There would be no dance, and there is only the dance.

...After the kingfisher's wing
Has answered light to light, and is silent, the light is still
​At the still point of the turning world.

Importance of Place, Importance of a Name

In the name Stillpoint we honor the past and look for inspiration to guide us into the future.

2011

The Connolly's renamed the farm they had just purchased Stillpoint. They spent a year building fences, clearing rocks and dead trees and renovating the farmhouse before beginning construction of their current house, the indoor riding arena and (a few years later) the outdoor riding ring. 




Excerpted from Burnt Norton by T.S. Eliot